Grand Theft

When facing a theft offense in Ohio, it is crucial you understand what comes next. Grand theft, in particular, has very harsh penalties. A person convicted of grand theft could possibly face felony charges that incorporate huge fines and even possible prison terms.

Grand theft charges are classified by the value of the items stolen. In some cases, a person may not even understand the value of an item or property. Putting themselves in an even more difficult situation then they would be if it was a simple petit theft case.

If you or someone you know has been charged with grand theft, it is imperative that you seek assistance from an experienced criminal defense attorney.

Cincinnati Attorneys for Grand Theft Charges in Ohio

The Ohio justice system can be extremely daunting. Even if you are completely innocent, the complexities of the legal matters in your case may muddle your defense. It is important that you obtain experienced legal representation if you or a loved one has been charged with grand theft.

Joslyn Law Firm is a group of established criminal defense attorneys who are dedicated to protecting your freedoms. We have been practicing law in the southern Ohio region for over twenty years. Our attorneys are passionate about what we do, and are creative in using all possible resources to formulate a sturdy defense. The attorneys at Joslyn Law Firm are calculating in creating a defense and aggressive in the courtroom. Find an attorney who can be your sail in these choppy legal waters. Contact us at (513) 399-6289 today.

The attorneys at Joslyn Law Firm represent clients throughout the greater Hamilton County area and surrounding cities including Reading, Springfield, Batavia, Cincinnati, Harrison, Norwood, and Montgomery.

Overview for Grand Theft Charges in Cincinnati, Ohio


Definition of Theft under Ohio Law

The Ohio Revised Code § 2913.02 details the legal definition for theft. The prosecution must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that a person did the following to be convicted of theft:

With purpose to deprive the owner of property or services, a person knowingly obtains or exerts control over either property or services in any of the following ways:

  • Without the consent of the owner or person authorized to give consent;
  • Beyond the scope of the express or implied consent of the owner or person authorized to give consent;
    • Through the means of deception;
    • Through a threat; or
    • Through means of intimidation.

Theft v. Grand Theft in Ohio

In Ohio, the classification of a theft offense is dependent on the value of the property or item stolen. In grand theft cases, the items or property stolen have much higher worth than theft charges.

Theft in Ohio, distinguished from petit theft, is the unlawful taking of property or services valued between $1,000 and $7,000. Ohio considers theft a fifth degree felony. It is the lowest felony a person can face with a possible fine up to $2,500 and potential incarceration for up to 12 months.

Grand theft, on the other hand, involves the unlawful taking of property or services between $7,000 to $150,000. Additionally, a crime can be considered grand theft if it is a stolen firearm, dangerous ordnance, or any motor vehicle. The penalty for a grand theft charge is dependent on what item or services were taken.

If a person steals an item, property, or services that totals between $7,000 to $150,00, then the penalty will be a felony of the fourth degree. A fourth degree felony will entail a possible fine up to $5,000 and a maximum of up to 18 months in prison.

Any theft of firearms or dangerous ordnances is treated much more harshly under Ohio law. If a person is convicted of stealing a firearm, he or she will face a felony of the third degree. A third degree felony incorporates a fine up to $10,000 and a possible prison sentence of up to 5 years in prison.

Lastly, if the firearm or dangerous ordnance was stolen from a federal licensed firearms dealer it will be charged as a felony of the first degree. A first degree felony is the highest offense on the felony level. It has very harsh penalties including a fine of up to $20,000, and a prison term up to 11 years in prison.


Additional Resources

Ohio Theft Statute § 2913.02 – Visit the official website for Ohio's laws and rules. See the specifics regarding theft statutes, what makes a theft aggravated or grand, and some admissible defenses that a person can use in court to explain their unlawful taking of property or services.

Point Please Contractor with $40,000 in Theft – Visit the official website for the Cincinnati Enquirer, a newspaper in the Cincinnati, Ohio community. Most people think of theft as taking of property but theft can also be based on services. Read an article about Salvatore Mattiaccio which serves as an illustration of a services based taking. Learn more on how he kept $40,000 after a woman cancelled a contract at his company, and what sort of penalties that await him.


Lawyer for Grand Theft Charges in Cincinnati, Ohio

The Ohio legal system can be intimidating. It is important that you stay informed and have a plan to battle your charges. The best way to do this is to obtain superior legal representation. Find that representation today. Contact an attorney at Joslyn Law Firm today.

Our attorneys are well-versed in theft, aggravated theft, and grand theft in the southern Ohio region. We are devoted to each and every one of our clients. The attorneys at Joslyn Law Firm want to do all we can to protect your civil rights. We approach each client with care and evaluate their cases with fresh eyes. Our attorneys have been admitted into several esteemed law associations such as the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers (NACDL), and the American Association of Justice.

Joslyn Law Firm accepts clients accused of drug crimes throughout the greater Southern Ohio area and nearby counties including Georgetown in Brown County, Cincinnati in Hamilton County, Batavia in Clermont County, Wilmington in Clinton County.

Call us today at (513) 399-6289, or submit an online contact form for a free consultation on your case today.

 


This article was last updated August 21, 2018.