Monroe Mayor's Court Contact Information

City of Monroe Urban Center

233 South Main Street

Monroe, OH 45050

Phone: 513-539-6201

Fax: 513-360-2218

Click Here for the Monroe Mayor Court Website

 

Monroe Mayor's Court

Monroe is a city located in Butler County. The city population was 12,442 when last counted in the 2010 U.S. Census.

The Monroe Mayor's Court's mission is to provide the Butler County community with a localized judicial process to rule on traffic and misdemeanor crimes that violate the City of Monroe Codified Ordinances.

Monroe Mayor's Court is held twice per month on the second and fourth Tuesday of every month at 4:00 p.m.

Attorney for Monroe Mayor's Court

If you or someone you know was arrested for a traffic offense such as speeding, failure to yield the right-of-way, OVI, or was arrested for a misdemeanor violation of the City of Monroe Codified Ordinances, speak to an experienced criminal defense attorney in Butler County, OH for help.

The attorneys at Joslyn Law Firm have practiced in multiple mayor's courts throughout Ohio and they understand the requirements of fighting clients' rights in the mayor's court process. Our attorneys are accessible and available, ready to meet your needs. In the past, our clients have been able to reach us by calling, texting, or emailing.

Call (513) 399-6289 now to schedule a free consultation and learn more about the value of an experienced criminal defense attorney in an Ohio Mayor's Court.


Offenses Heard in Monroe Mayor's Court

In addition, to offenses found in Federal or Ohio Statutes, the Monroe Mayor's Court code of Ordinances has a wide range of misdemeanor offenses that may be heard under Monroe Mayor's Court jurisdiction.

  • Sales to underage persons: prohibitions and misrepresentations -- § 612.02
  • Consumption in a motor vehicle -- § 612.04
  • Open Container -- § 612.07
  • Driving or physical control of vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or drugs -- § 434.02
  • Street Racing --§ 434.07
  • Right-of-way at intersections -- § 432.15
  • Operation of vehicle at stop and yield signs § 432.17
  • Drug Possession --§ 624.03(c)(2)
  • Cultivation of Marihuana -- § 624.025
  • Possession of drug abuse instruments -- § 624.04
  • Abusing harmful intoxicants -- § 624.07
  • Negligent assault -- § 636.03
  • Criminal Mischief -- § 642.11

Degrees of Misdemeanors Monroe Mayor's Court Hears

While Ohio Mayor's Courts are not authorized to hear any felonies or certain misdemeanors such as domestic violence, stalking, or violation of protection orders, Monroe Mayor's court is authorized to hear most misdemeanors. The following includes the list of misdemeanor's that the Monroe Mayor's Court can hear:

  • Minor Misdemeanors: fines of up to $150;
  • Fourth-Degree Misdemeanor: Up to 30 days in jail and up to $250 in fines;
  • Third-Degree Misdemeanor: Up to 60 days in jail and up to $500 fines;
  • Second-Degree Misdemeanor: Up to 90 days in jail and up to $750 fines;
  • First-Degree Misdemeanor: Up to 180 days in jail and up to $1,000 fines.

It is important to note that, if the offender is charged with an OVI, such convictions have additional penalties, such as driver's license suspension or ignition interlock placement.


Things to Know About Monroe Mayor's Court

While most Mayor's Courts have very similar procedures, there are small nuances between each of the Ohio Mayor's Court. Some things to know about Monroe Mayor's Court include the following:

Payouts

Minor misdemeanors are those that only charge a fine. Such fines can reach up to $150 dollars. A payout involves paying a minor misdemeanor violation without making an appearance in court. The fine should be paid to the Violations Bureau of the court. The fine amount is determined by the Magistrate.

Can I Get a Continuance

Yes. If you have a scheduling conflict with a set court date, you may obtain a continuance by signing a Time Waiver and your case will be continued until the next court date. If you do not have the amount due for a violation or a fine by the payment date, you may obtain a continuance signing a Time Waiver also. Speak with an experienced criminal defense attorney about the number of continuances you may receive from the court.

What Happens if I Miss the Court Date Without a Continuance

If you miss one court date without a signed court granted a continuance, then there will be a $10.00 penalty assessed to your court cost and fines. If you miss more than one court date, then the Court will issue a warrant for your arrest and a $50.00 penalty will be added to your court costs and fines. You may also have your driving privileges suspended.

Do I Have a Right to An Attorney?

When the charge can result in jail-time, then the court must provide the alleged offender with counsel. However, if an individual would like to personally obtain counsel, he or she always has a right to have personally provided counsel present.

Can I Appeal Monroe Mayor's Court

Yes. If an individual is unhappy with a decision handed down by Monroe Mayor's court, he or she may request that their case be heard by Monroe County Municipal Court. The Monroe County Municipal Court will review the case as if it is the first time the case was heard. Such review is called "de novo" review.


Monroe Mayor's Court Staff and Location

The Monroe Mayor's Court is located at:

City of Monroe Urban Center

233 South Main St.

Monroe, Ohio 45050

(513) 539-6201

Some of the Mayor court's notable staff includes:

  • Clerk of Courts: Rebecca Rosenbalm
  • Prosecutor: K. Philip Callahan
  • Magistrate: Honorable Jonathon Nerenberg

Find an Attorney for Monroe Mayor's Court in Butler County, OH

If you or someone you know has been arrested in Monroe in Butler County, OH, understanding your rights in mayor's court is important. Speak with an experienced criminal defense attorney at Joslyn Law Firm for more information about how an attorney can help you navigate the often confusing process of mayor's court.

Call (513) 399-6289 now for a free, no obligations consultation that will allow our Monroe Mayor's Court attorney to provide an honest and complete evaluation of your case.

This article was last updated on Tuesday, August 1, 2017.