Cincinnati Indecent Exposure Defense Lawyers

Criminal “public indecency” (also commonly known as indecent exposure) as codified by Ohio Code § 2907.09 is more complicated than its name suggests. Section 2907.09 criminalizes a handful of reckless and/or intentional sexual conduct occurring within the physical proximity of an offended victim. Public indecency covers crimes from streaking at the Great American Ball Park to felony-level sexual exposure to a child. Either way, Cincinnati residents convicted of public indecency may be designated Tier I sexual offenders subject to registration on the Ohio sex offender registry for 15 years. Designated sexual offenders are subject to strict residency, travel, work, and lifestyle restrictions often worse than the direct penalties of an indecent exposure conviction itself.

Experienced Indecent Exposure Defense Attorneys Protecting the Rights of those Accused in Cincinnati

Don’t let a reckless misunderstanding change your life. Ohio’s public indecency statute is very specific, and offenders may avoid designation as a sexual offender with the help of an experienced Hamilton County indecent exposure defense attorney at Joslyn Law Firm. Contact the Joslyn Law Firm’s Cincinnati public indecency and sex crimes defense lawyers online or at (614) 444-1900 immediately for your free, confidential Ohio indecent exposure defense consultation.  

Cincinnati Information Center for Public Indecency (Indecent Exposure) Charges

The Joslyn Law Firm’s Cincinnati Information Center for Public Indecency (Indecent Exposure) Charges (Ohio Code § 2907.09) provides an overview of the criminal elements, penalties, and defenses to indecent exposure charges in Cincinnati. Indecent exposure is an Ohio sex crime potentially punishable as a felony with designation as an Ohio sex offender - as such, Cincinnati defendants should take these charges seriously. 

  1. Defining What Constitutes Criminal Indecent Exposure (Public Indecency) in Cincinnati
  2. The Specific Conduct Punishable as Indecent Exposure in Cincinnati
  3. Understanding and Defending Against Accidental Public Indecency in Hamilton County
  4. Overview of the Hamilton County Court Process for § 2907.09 Public Indecency Charges
  5. Special Evidentiary & Court Procedures for Cincinnati Indecent Exposure to a Minor Accusations
  6. Possible Direct Penalties & Sentencing Range for a Cincinnati Indecent Exposure (Ohio Code § 2907.09) Conviction
  7. The Serious Indirect & Collateral Penalties of an Ohio Indecent Exposure Conviction
  8. Common Defenses to Cincinnati Indecent Exposure Charges
  9. Cincinnati Indecent Exposure Charges (Ohio Code § 2907.09) FAQs
  10. Cincinnati Public Indecency and Sex Crimes Resources

 


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1.  Defining What Constitutes Criminal Indecent Exposure (Public Indecency) in Cincinnati 

There is no single definition of indecent exposure in Ohio. However, neither a public display nor nudity is required to sustain public indecency charges under Ohio Code § 2907.09. Sexual activity occurring in private or even simulation of that activity in jest may be sufficient to sustain these charges in Cincinnati. Ohio’s indecent exposure statute does criminalize the reckless exposure of the defendant’s genitals in public, but it also criminalizes masturbation, sexual conduct (sex), and conduct that reasonably appears to be sexual conduct or masturbation. Offenders may be charged with public indecency as long as at least one victim in the offender’s proximately (public or private) is “affronted” by any of the following conduct:

  • Masturbation (actual, simulated, or apparent). Defined as the manipulation of one’s genitals or certain erogenous zones, i.e., female breasts, for the purpose of sexual arousal. Even masturbation without nudity can sustain indecent exposure charges in Cincinnati.
  • Exposure of the offender’s private parts or Genitals do not include female breasts or buttocks. However, exposure of these body parts to simulate or commit a sex act or incident to masturbation may still be punishable as indecent exposure.
  • Sex/sexual conduct (actual, simulated, or apparent). Sexual conduct is defined by Ohio law as vaginal, oral, or anal intercourse/penetration regardless of the object/body part used and the parties’ respective genders.
  • Private exposure of the offender’s genitals to someone under the age of 18 for the purpose of luring the minor into sexual activity or for personal sexual arousal or gratification.

The only geographical limit contained in Ohio Code § 2907.09 is that the qualifying conduct is “likely to be viewed by and affront others who are in the person’s physical proximity and who are not [adult] members of the person’s household.” The exposure is considered “public” if it is within view of someone who is not an adult member of your household and/or a minor. 


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2.  The Specific Conduct Punishable as Indecent Exposure in Cincinnati

Every criminal statute has a set of elements that must be proved “beyond a reasonable doubt.” Ohio’s public indecency statute has two distinct sets of base elements, which are those that must be proved in every case, under which there is a series of separate provisions dictating one or more of the circumstances under which the conduct must occur to sustain a finding of guilt. Hamilton County prosecutors must always prove the following base elements of public indecency in Cincinnati if the victim did not live with the defendant: 

  • The qualifying conduct was undertaken with knowledge or reckless disregard to whether it was in physical proximity to and an affront to another
  • The conduct was actually or likely to be viewed by another
  • The conduct was an affront to the other, which typically means the victim was offended, insulted, disrespected, upset, or injured by the display
  • The other person (victim) was in the offender’s physical proximity, which means a reasonable personal would have felt it necessary to physically move away from the offender as opposed to just avert his/her eyes
  • The victim was not a member of the offender’s household or living with the offender
  • The victim was not legally married to the offender

In addition to proving each of these base elements beyond a reasonable doubt, Cincinnati prosecutors must also prove that one or more of the following occurred in conjunction with the above:

  • The offender exposed his or her private parts
  • The offender engaged in sex or masturbation
  • The offender engaged in conduct that an ordinary person would believe was sex or masturbation (public indecency may be charged when the conduct was simulated or in jest) 

If the reasonable observers were not members of your household, the exposure didn’t need to be intentional. It’s enough to recklessly decide to have sex in your car, for example, without checking to see if anyone else is in the parking lot.

Different elements apply if the person in view of the conduct was a minor (under 18), even if that minor lived in the offender’s household (child, foster child, niece, roommate’s son). The base elements for indecent exposure to a minor, especially a minor member of the offender’s household, are as follows: 

  • The conduct was done knowingly or intentionally
  • A minor actually or was likely to view the conduct
  • The conduct was or would have been an “affront” to the minor
  • The offender was in the minor’s physical proximity
  • The offender and the minor were not married

Prosecutors must then prove one or more of the following occurred in conjunction with the above elements:

  • The offender engaged in masturbation
  • The offender engaged in sex (qualifying sexual conduct)
  • The offender engaged in conduct that an ordinary person would believe was sex or masturbation
  • The offender exposed his/her genitals to the minor for the purpose of (1) personal sexual arousal, (2) personal sexual gratification, or (3) to lure the minor into sexual activity 

If the victim was a minor member of the offender’s household, such as a girlfriend’s child, both sections of § 2907.09 are applicable. Cincinnati prosecutors will generally charge offenders under the subsection with the highest punishable offense level.


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3.  Understanding and Defending Against Accidental Public Indecency in Hamilton County

Public indecency is a specific intent crime in Ohio. The offender has to actually or recklessly intend to expose himself/herself when the conduct is likely in view of another. Negligent or accidental exposure is not criminal, and disputes often arise when the parties disagree as to the offender’s intent. A defendant’s intent can fall into one of the following four legal categories, and Cincinnati prosecutors have the burden of proving the applicable statutory intent: 

  • Intentional/Purposeful Conduct: Done on purpose. For example, the defendant waited for families to arrive at the park before masturbating in a public place because he/she was aroused by doing so in front of others.
  • Knowing Conduct: The same as intentional exposure but covers when the defendant should have known others were present, was willfully blind to their presence, or intended for others to be present even if he wasn’t sure they would be. For example, an offender masturbating in a public park, hoping others were around even if he wasn’t sure of this fact.
  • Reckless Exposure: Done with carelessness or with disregard. For example, an offender is masturbating in a public park, knowing others commonly walk through the park at that time, even if he didn’t care whether or not they showed up.
  • Negligent Exposure: The defendant was less careful than an ordinary individual would have been but not criminally so. For example, a defendant exposes himself in a public restroom thinking he locked the door. If someone walks in, he may not be guilty of public indecency even though he was negligent in failing to lock the door.
  • Accidental Exposure: Completely unintentional and not due to ordinary negligence, such as someone pulling down your pants in public or a stranger breaking into your house when you’re engaged in sexual conduct.

The circumstances surrounding the offense determine whether the conduct was negligent, reckless, knowing, or intentional. Defendants may be held to higher standards of care in certain circumstances but not others. For example, a defendant does not recklessly expose herself in her home if she forgets to lock the door, and an uninvited guest walks in, but forgetting to lock the door while masturbating in a public restroom, especially with children around, may be considered reckless. An experienced Cincinnati public indecency defense lawyer will review the circumstances surrounding public indecency charges and, if applicable, defeat the mens rea associated with the offense.


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4.  Overview of the Hamilton County Court Process for § 2907.09 Indecent Exposure Charges

There is a constitutional difference between felony and misdemeanor court procedures in Cincinnati. Public indecency under § 2907.09 is punishable as both a misdemeanor and felony depending on the subsection under which a defendant is charged and his/her criminal history. Prosecutors often rely on evidence obtained after charges are filed to review the defendant’s criminal record and obtain more information about the victim. Prosecutors cannot file misdemeanor charges and subsequently amend the indictment to reflect felony charges without running afoul of the Fifth Amendment. 

The Fifth Amendment requires that evidence of felony-level public indecency be presented to a grand jury before charges are filed. The grand jury must review the evidence and find there is probable cause to bring felony charges against a defendant, but this isn’t necessary for misdemeanor charges. Failure to indict is fatal to felony public indecency charges in Cincinnati, and an experienced Cincinnati indecent exposure defense lawyer will always review your charges for constitutional violations. Provided there are no apparent preliminary constitutional violations, those accused or charged with indecent exposure in Hamilton County may expect the following:

  • Sex Crimes Investigation: Cincinnati’s sex crimes investigators will respond to any reported public indecency claims. They will gather any video/photograph evidence, if available, take witness testimony, and attempt to interview the alleged defendant. If the evidence is sufficient to show a probable violation of § 2907.09, the evidence will be turned over to Hamilton County prosecutors.
  • Information/Indictment: If the evidence shows potential felony charges, prosecutors must seek a grand jury indictment. Charges may be filed without an indictment if you’re only being accused of misdemeanor indecent exposure in Cincinnati.
  • Criminal Summons/Arrest Warrant: Arrest warrants are issued for felonies and may be issued for misdemeanor charges. However, those charged with a misdemeanor may simply receive a criminal summons to appear before the municipal court on a certain date and time similar to a traffic ticket summons.
  • Initial Appearance/Arraignment: During the defendant’s first appearance before the court, he or she is officially informed of the charges against him/her, read his/her rights, asked if he/she pleads guilty or not guilty to the charges, and has bail set, if any. If a criminal defense attorney has not been retained, the defendant may hire private defense counsel or request the public defender at this hearing.
  • Defense Investigation/Discovery: Cincinnati prosecutors must turn over all relevant evidence obtained during the investigation, including the names and contact information for all witnesses. The defense may obtain its own witnesses, alibi evidence, and/or have the prosecutor’s evidence reviewed for reliability. It may also search for contrary evidence and interview all prosecution witnesses. After gathering and reviewing all evidence, the defendant may be offered a plea deal. He or she may also reject a plea deal and proceed to trial. In some cases, an experienced Cincinnati public indecency defense attorney can get indecent exposure charges dropped before trial based on the evidence obtained during discovery.
  • Pre-Trial Hearing/Guilty Plea: This is a brief hearing before the trial to determine whether there is enough evidence to go forward. This hearing may be waived or used to plea guilty pursuant to a plea deal.
  • Private Evidentiary Hearings for Child Victims: This special hearing is not required in public indecency cases, but it is required for similar sex offense charges in Ohio. Some judges discretionarily order this hearing in all sex crimes cases or cases involving minor victims. It gives the parties the chance to discuss any sensitive sexual evidence and testimony outside the presence of a jury and come to an early agreement to protect the defendant and victim’s reputation during trial.
  • Trial: Once the jury is selected, the trial begins with the parties opening statements followed by the prosecution’s presentation of evidence. The defense presents evidence once the prosecution rests. Misdemeanor trials typically only last between 1 to 3 days. Felony trials may last longer. At the end of the trial, the judge instructs the jury as to Ohio criminal and sex crimes law, and they deliberate.
  • Verdict: The jury may deliberate as long as necessary to reach a verdict but may also be a “hung jury,” which means they couldn’t decide. A hung jury results in a mistrial.
  • Release/Sentencing: A not guilty verdict will result in your release, and you may not be charged or tried again for the same offense in Ohio courts. You may be tried again if the jury is hung, but Cincinnati prosecutors often drop misdemeanor charges or offer a better plea deal rather than conduct another trial. Defendants found guilty are not sentenced immediately after a guilty verdict. The court takes time to review the sentencing laws and any legal aggravating or mitigating factors. Your criminal defense lawyer can argue for leniency during the sentencing hearing. 

Most prosecutors don’t want to expend resources on misdemeanor trials for first-time offenders. An experienced Cincinnati public indecency defense lawyer may negotiate a reduction in charges to a non-sexual offense or simply negotiate payment of a small fine in exchange for a guilty plea. This is more difficult, however, in cases where the victim was under 18 or felony charges are levied. 


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5.  Special Evidentiary & Court Procedures for Cincinnati Indecent Exposure to a Minor Accusations

Ohio Code § 2907.09 has specific subsections and penalties applicable when the victim is a minor, including a minor member of the defendant’s household. A minor member of the defendant’s household is someone under 18 who considers the defendant’s home his/her permanent address. Household members do not include someone in the same apartment building, a separate apartment, non-residential family members, or frequent guests. The following types of indecent exposure are prohibited even if the minor is a member of your household (child, grandchild, niece, sibling): 

  • Engaging in masturbation or conduct appearing as masturbation to the reasonable observer
  • Engaging in sexual conduct or actions appearing to be sexual conduct to the reasonable observer
  • Exposing genitals to a minor
  • Knowingly exposing one’s genitals to a minor member of your household to lure the minor into sexual activity and/or for the purpose of personal arousal or gratification 

Public indecency is often a lesser-included offense of more serious child sex crimes in Ohio and can indicate the presence of domestic sexual abuse. For this reason, prosecutors closely scrutinize defendants charged with indecent exposure to a minor, especially a minor in the offender’s household. Cincinnati sex crimes investigations and prosecutions involving minor victims are sensitive and may cause additional psychological trauma to children. As such, Ohio judges typically employ certain procedural safeguards during sex crimes prosecutions involving minors that aren’t employed in other types of cases including:

  • Special in camera (private) evidentiary and motion hearings to avoid public dissemination of sensitive information involving the minor
  • Appointment of a neutral guardian ad litem or special child victim’s advocate to represent the best interest of the child
  • Permitting child testimony via closed-circuit camera or behind a screen to avoid direct physical confrontation with the offender
  • Allowing therapy animals or child psychological specialists to be present during court proceedings
  • Extending certain hearing and court deadlines to coincide with the child’s school breaks
  • Asking the parties to agree on the truthfulness of certain evidence to avoid or minimize necessary victim testimony
  • Recommending plea deals that avoid victim testimony
  • Involving social services when the child was a member of the defendant’s household 

Certain safeguards, such as agreeing to admit evidence or waive in-person testimony, require the defendant’s approval to avoid constitutional violations. To the extent these waivers don’t affect your defense, it’s recommended Cincinnati sex crimes defendants agree to these safeguards to remain in good standing with the judge (who will eventually impose a future sentence). Experienced Cincinnati indecent exposure to minors defense lawyers will review any victim protection recommendations to help defendants understand what, if any, professional concessions should be made.     


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6.  Possible Direct Penalties & Sentencing Range for a Cincinnati Indecent Exposure Conviction

Ohio’s public indecency statute has a complicated set of sentencing rules. Indecent exposure is punishable with anything from a small fine to imprisonment with sexual offender designation. Understanding the direct penalties associated with a § 2907.09 conviction can be difficult without the help of an experienced Cincinnati public indecency defense attorney. Public indecency is punishable as follows based on the specific subsection under which the offender was convicted, also taking into consideration his/her prior criminal record and the age of the victim.

  • For exposure of one’s genitals as a first-time § 2907.09 offender, public indecency is a fourth-degree misdemeanor punishable by up to one month in prison and/or a fine up to $250
  • For exposure of one’s genitals as a second-time offender or for masturbation or sexual conduct as a first-time offender, public indecency is a third-degree misdemeanor punishable by up to two months in prison and/or a fine up to $500
  • For exposure of one’s genitals to a minor as a first-time offender, for exposure of one’s private parts to an adult as a third-time offender, for masturbation or sexual conduct as a second-time offender, or for indecent exposure to a minor as a first-time offender, public indecency is a second-degree misdemeanor punishable by up to three months in prison and/or a fine up to $750
  • For exposure of one’s genitals to a minor as a third-time offender, for exposure of one’s genitals to an adult as a fourth-time offender and thereafter, for masturbation or engaging in actual or apparent sexual conduct in view of a minor as a first-time offender, for masturbation/sexual conduct as a third-time offender, or for exposing oneself to a minor for the purpose of sexual gratification, public indecency is a first-degree misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in prison and/or a fine up to $1000
  • For exposure of one’s private parts to a minor as a fourth-time offender, engaging in masturbation/sexual conduct in view of a minor as a third-time offender, or for exposing oneself to a minor for the purpose of sexual gratification as a second-time offender and thereafter, public indecency is a fifth-degree felony punishable by up to one year in prison and/or a fine up to $2,500 

Any offender convicted of knowingly exposing his/her genitals to a minor to lure the minor into sexual activity and/or for the purpose of personal arousal or gratification must be classified as a Tier I sex offender and child sex offender subject to registration on the Ohio sex offender registry. Cincinnati judges do not have discretion in this regard. However, judges may waive designation as an Ohio sexual offender if either of the following applies:

  • The offender was less than 10 years older than the minor victim, such as a 14-year-old victim and 21-year-old offender
  • The offender is more than 10 years older than the victim but is a first-time offender

In addition to these direct penalties, Hamilton County judges may order the following during sentencing. 

  • Mandatory restitution to compensate the victim for any direct costs of the indecency, including counseling services
  • Payment of all court or investigation costs
  • Attendance at sex offender counseling or drug/alcohol rehabilitation
  • Probation/Community Control
  • Community Service

Correctly interpreting the applicable sentencing provision is essential for protecting the rights of Cincinnati public indecency offenders and arguing for sentencing mitigation. There is a substantial difference between a misdemeanor and felony-level public indecency charges. Avoiding designation as a felon and sexual offender is essential for alleviating the life-changing direct and collateral consequences of an indecent exposure conviction.

 


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7.  The Serious Indirect & Collateral Penalties of an Ohio Indecent Exposure Conviction

The indirect and often unexpected consequences of an Ohio sex crimes conviction generally stem from designation as a felon and/or a sexual offender. Avoiding either designation with the help of an experienced Cincinnati sex crimes defense lawyer can mitigate the majority of these collateral consequences. Designated felons, including those convicted of fifth-degree felony charges for indecent exposure to a minor, face the following potential consequences: 

  • Loss of firearms rights
  • Immigration consequences
  • Travel restrictions
  • Loss of/Inability to obtain certain professional licenses
  • Loss of/Inability to obtain public employment, such as police officers, town clerks, or firefighters
  • Loss of/Ineligibility for certain public benefits including financial and housing benefits
  • Family law and domestic relations consequences
  • Difficulty obtaining private employment
  • Temporary loss of voting rights 

Designated sexual offenders registered on the Ohio Sex Offender Registry are further subject to the following penalties: 

  • Mandatory law enforcement check-ins every year for 15 years
  • Public dissemination of your name, address, crime, and vehicle information
  • Registration of private information (phone numbers, screen names, website and game handles, and email) searchable by law enforcement officials
  • State, city, and local residency restrictions such as inability to live within a certain range of a school zone, in public housing, or in certain condos/apartment complexes
  • Public and private employment restrictions
  • Difficulty attending Ohio colleges and obtaining financial aid
  • Potential loss of child custody and inability to foster/adopt
  • Inability to work or live with children other than your own

The only way to avoid the serious direct and collateral consequences of an Ohio public indecency conviction is to avoid conviction by presenting a strong defense to Cincinnati indecent exposure and sex crimes charges. 


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8.  Common Defenses to Cincinnati Indecent Exposure Charges

There are substantive and procedural defenses to sex crimes charges in Ohio. Procedural defenses commonly involve constitutional or evidentiary violations and don’t go towards the defendant’s innocence or guilt. Examples include getting charges dropped for failure to indict, failure to provide an attorney, or proving evidence was seized illegally. Substantive defenses go to the heart of the offense and are used to negate, disprove, or raise a reasonable doubt as to an essential element of indecent exposure charges. They include:

  • Victim is a Member of the Household: Cincinnati residents are free to engage in certain activities within the privacy of their homes. Accordingly, household members (excluding minors) can’t object to these natural freedoms. Proving the victim was an adult member of your household at the time of the offense is a complete defense to indecent exposure charges in Cincinnati. Household members typically include any dependents claimed in a tax year, family members (including in-laws and step-families) living in the household at least part of the year, or a non-family member who lives in your home nearly all year (his/her domicile). Household members do not include temporary visitors or others in your apartment complex.
  • Conduct Does Not Qualify as Indecent: Kissing, mooning, and toplessness (even female toplessness) generally don’t qualify as indecent exposure in Ohio. They may qualify as part of masturbation or sexual conduct, but they are not sufficient to sustain public indecency charges on their own.
  • Marriage: Marriage is a complete defense to indecent exposure charges, but the marriage must be valid, and the parties must not be separated or divorcing. This exception applies whether the exposure was private or public, but the presence of a spouse does not protect a defendant from another witness’s claim of indecent exposure.
  • Victim Not in Physical Proximity/Victim Not Affronted: Proving that the victim was not in the offender’s physical proximity at the time of the offense is a complete defense to public indecency charges. Evidence that the victim consented to the exposure and was not offended by the same is also a complete defense to public indecency charges against adult victims. Whether the victim was in the offender’s physical proximity is generally left to the jury to determine based on the facts of each case.

Even if the above defenses do not defeat public indecency charges, they may be enough to convince the judge to impose a minimum sentence, keep you off the sex offender registry, and otherwise mitigate the penalties for indecent exposure charges in Cincinnati.  


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9.  Cincinnati Indecent Exposure Charges (Ohio Code § 2907.09) FAQs

The following are brief answers to some of the most common questions our experienced Cincinnati sex crimes defense lawyers receive about Ohio public indecency charges under § 2907.09.

    1. What is indecent exposure in Ohio?

Indecent exposure is an alternative designation used for a sex crime called “public indecency” under Ohio Code § 2907.09. This code section criminalizes exposing one’s private parts or engaging in actual or apparent masturbation or sex in view of someone who would be offended thereby. The victim must be in the offender’s “physical proximity” and must be either a minor (under 18) or non-household member.

    1. What is public indecency in Ohio?

 

Public indecency is indecent exposure in Ohio. Ohio Code § 2907.09 is titled “Public Indecency,” and it criminalizes various types of what’s typically referred to as indecent exposure.
 

    1. Is exposing yourself in public a felony?

 

Not usually. Exposing yourself in public may be a felony in the fifth degree if you are not a first-time offender, and you recklessly engage in prohibited conduct in front of minors (under 18). If you’ve never been convicted of indecent exposure before and the victim was not a minor, public indecency is a misdemeanor.

 

    1. Is mooning considered to be indecent exposure?

 

Not alone. The buttock is not considered one’s genitals under Ohio Code § 2907.09. However, showing one’s butthole or mimicking any type of sexual gesture may be considered apparent masturbation or sexual conduct in Ohio sufficient to sustain public indecency charges.

 

    1. Is it illegal to skinny dip in your backyard?

 

Not usually, but skinny-dipping may be illegal in rare cases. If you’re in the physical proximity of a non-member of your household who does not consent to the exposure, this can be public indecency. Skinny-dipping without a care that your neighbors can clearly see may also be indecent exposure if you’re in their physical proximity at the time. However, skinny-dipping with another consenting adult when there is a substantial distance between your home and your neighbors is likely not considered public indecency in Ohio.

 

    1. How do you prove indecent exposure?

 

Police reports, victim testimony, photographs, videos, and/or social media evidence of exposure typically form the basis of public indecency prosecutions in Cincinnati. Police will attempt to get the defendant’s testimony to corroborate the victim’s testimony or obtain evidence, and many defendants mistakenly give police the evidence they need.

    1. Are there ways to defend against indecent exposure charges?

Yes. There are multiple defenses to indecent exposure charges in Cincinnati including:

  • Constitutional and evidentiary violations
  • The victim is your spouse or adult member of your household
  • The exposure was not knowing or reckless
  • The victim was not in your physical proximity at the time of the exposure
  • The exposure did not qualify under one of the four categories of conduct criminalized by Ohio Code § 2907.09

An experienced Cincinnati public indecency and sex crimes defense lawyer will review the evidence and charges levied in every case to determine the best available defense. 

    1. How can an Ohio indecent exposure defense lawyer help? 

In addition to raising any applicable defenses to Cincinnati indecent exposure charges, reviewing a plea deal, and/or fighting to mitigate your sentence, hiring an experienced Ohio public indecency defense attorney is essential to prevent a life-changing sex offender designation. Further, Hamilton County investigators often obtain evidence of indecent exposure when the defendant willing gives testimony. A qualified Cincinnati indecent exposure and sex crimes defense lawyer can help protect your Fifth Amendment right to silence, which often prevents police from obtaining information essential to bring public indecency charges in Cincinnati. 

 


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10. Cincinnati Public Indecency and Sex Crimes Resources 

If you were the victim of indecent exposure, consider contacting the following advocacy groups to discuss your needs. For select offenders, intentional indecent exposure to a minor is indicative of more serious sexual deviance. Reporting potential claims of indecent exposure with the help of the following Cincinnati advocacy groups may help both victims and offenders avoid more serious sex crimes charges: 


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Contact a Cincinnati Indecent Exposure Attorney as Soon as Possible

To discuss a specific indecent exposure case or your rights in Cincinnati, contact the experienced public indecency and indecent exposure defense attorneys the Joslyn Law Firm for a free sex crimes defense consultation and case review online or at (614) 444-1900 today.


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